Could these 3 Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Pain Reduction Support Tips Help You?

Many of us with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome have some level of chronic pain. This can be from inflammation, from muscular pain, or from joint pain.

When the mast cells are over reactive in general, they release inflammatory chemicals. These chemicals can cause swelling and discomfort. If you are in a mast cell flare, there can be a cascade of inflammation. That inflammation can put pressure on nerves and cause generalized pain.

Mast cells in the muscles can also become over reactive. When this happens, the muscles can get painful like fibromyalgia pain. Joints can be affected as well in MCAS. In many people with MCAS, the mast cells can become overactive in the ligament and tendons. This makes those ligaments and tendons looser and  spongier. As a result, the joints can be less stable. The reduction in stability can cause increased pain.

I’m often asked by my clients with MCAS what to do for pain. Many over the counter pain relievers, like NSAIDs, can cause histamine release. Many prescription pain relievers are problematic as well. Fortunately, there are some good natural pain relieving supplements that also stabilize mast cells. Here are my top 3:

  1. Boswellia Serrata* – this supplement is great for supporting the joints and surrounding connective tissue. It is also an excellent mast cell stabilizer. Regular use of boswellia can support pain reduction as well. It is important that the Boswellia be standardized to be effective. I use Pure Encapsulations Boswellia*. For daily use, I take 1 capsule 2x/day with food. In a flare, I take 2 capsules 2x/day with food. Always take with food or it can bother your stomach.
  2. Magnesium – Magnesium is one of the most important nutrients you can supplement. And almost everyone is low in it. Magnesium is involved in over 380 processes in the body. Magnesium is really critical for proper nerve signaling and muscle functioning. Magnesium supplementation has been shown in research to reduce nerve pain. It can also reduce muscle spasms. Not just any Magnesium will work, though. The oxide form isn’t well absorbed. The citrate form is often made from fermentation, so it can cause histamine reactions. Some people get migraines from the aspartate form. Some people love the glycinate form, and others get anxiety from it. I’ve had the best luck with these two forms:

    Designs for Health Magnesium Malate* – Magnesium malate can support reduction of muscle discomfort. It also can support energy production. I take in divided doses and dose to bowel tolerance. (This means you want to take the maximum you can take without getting loose stools. Start with 1 capsule 2x/day. Increase by 1 capsule/day until you get loose stools. Then back just until you have normal stools again.)

    Protocol for Life Balance ProtoSorb Magnesium Threonate* – Magnesium Threonate is the only form of Magnesium that can cross the blood brain barrier to reach the brain. I use it to support reduction of nerve pain and restful sleep. I take 3 capsules at bedtime. If I’m feeling anxious, I also take 1-2 capsules in the morning. Magnesium Threonate does not usually cause loose stools, so it can be taken easily with Magnesium Malate.

  3. Pure Encapsulations Phyto UltraComfort* – a blend of White Willow, Boswellia, Curcumin, and Devil’s Claw – This is more of an as needed supplement than something to take daily. We’ve already covered the benefits of Boswellia. Willow bark, curcumin, and cat’s claw all reduce prostaglandins – molecules involved in pain signaling. Devil’s Claw has been shown to support musculoskeletal comfort. There is also a little phenylalanine – an amino acid that supports the calming of pain receptors. White Willow is the natural form of aspirin, so don’t use this blend if you are allergic or sensitive to aspirin or salicylates. Otherwise, you may really like this blend. Be sure to take with meals. The usual dose is 2 capsules between 1 and 3x/day, as needed.

Finding the supplements that are safe when you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome can be tricky. I hope this gives you some new ideas and some options to help with pain!

What do you use for pain support with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome? Please share your top go-to supplements in the comments below!

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