Perilla Plant Mast Cell 360

Why Perilla Seed Extract is the Mast Cell Supporting Supplement You’ve Never Heard About – for those with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome & Histamine Intolerance

There are some really amazing supplements that can support people with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome and Histamine Intolerance.

Have you ever heard of Perilla Seed Extract? I certainly hadn’t until I started reading the research.

What to Know about Perilla Seed Extract if you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

Perilla is a plant that has been around for a very long time. In fact, it is a very common herb used in Korea, Japan, Thailand, and Vietnam cooking.

When I was in Korea, they used Perilla often in cooking. The leaves, seeds, and oil are all edible.

Perilla is also called Shiso or Japanese Basil. And it is even used frequently in in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Perilla Seed Extract is a bit different from Perilla Oil.

Perilla oil is one of the highest oils in Omega 3s. It is used for cooking. And also for:

  • Paints
  • Varnishes
  • Inks
  • Linoleum

But Perilla Seed Extract is a bit different.

Perilla Seed Extract is high in Apigenin, Luteolin, and Rosmarinic Acids. And research has shown these actions and properties:

  • Reductions in histamine and the mast cell cytokine TNF-a
  • Inhibiting inflammation from Arachidonic Acid (an inflammation causing fatty acid)
  • Reductions in skin allergic reactions
  • Improvements in respiratory symptoms

When to Consider Perilla Seed Extract:

  • Mast Cell Activation
  • Mold Toxicity
  • Allergy symptoms
  • Respiratory symptoms
  • Food sensitivities
  • NOX genetic variants

You can find out

I go into a lot more detail on these actions and the research on Perilla Seed Extract in the Top 8 Mast Cell Supporting Supplements Master Class. I also talk about the 7 other top supplements for supporting Mast Cells. You can find out more about the class here:

Supplements Masterclass button linked to /master-class

Why you may need different types of Mast Cell supports if you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

Often people with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome and Histamine Intolerance do better when they have a variety of supports on board.

This is because the Mast Cells have hundreds of receptors on their surfaces. Here is a great diagram of some types of mast cell receptors

Mast Cell Receptors Image source: David Spoerl, Haig Nigolian, Christoph Czarnetzki, Thomas Harr. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1223; doi:10.3390/ijms18061223

When mast cells are overactive, these receptors can become overly sensitive. So sometimes reducing that sensitivity can help.

Also, mast cells can produce over a thousand different mediators. Here is just a small selection:

  • Amines like:
    Histamine
    Polyamines
  • Proteoglycans
    Heparin
    Chondroitin sulfates
    Serglycin
  • Lysosomal enzymes
    β-Glucuronidase
    β-Hexosaminidase

  • Proteases
    Tryptases
    Chymase-1
    Cathepsin G
    Granzyme B
    Carboxypeptidase A3

  • Serotonin
  • Leukotrienes
  • Prostaglandins
  • PDGF

  • Cytokines
    TNFα
    TGF-β1
    IFNγ
    βFGF
    Interleukins
    Chemokines
    SCF

  • Substance P
  • VEGF

As you can probably imagine, this is why there isn’t a single supplement for Mast Cell Activation and Histamine Intolerance. It is often finding the right combo for the right person. Then these supplements can work in synergy with each other.

What to Know about Sourcing Supplements if you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

One of the most important things to know about supplements is to be sure to use a high-quality brand from a reputable supplier.

There are 4 important reasons for this:

  1. There are many fillers that can trigger Mast Cell Activation and excess Histamine. This is more common in lower quality brands. (But some pharmaceutical grade brands have triggers. This is why I check the ingredients very carefully.
  2. Many lower quality supplements don’t have good quality testing. This can mean that you can have very little of the active ingredient in one capsule. And then 10x the active ingredient in the next capsule.
  3. Places like Amazon and Vitacost don’t have climate control. I’ve talked with people who worked in their warehouses. The supplements can sit in 100-120-degrees for several weeks. This can degrade the quality of some supplements. And either mean it doesn’t work like it should. Or it can mean it causes reactions.
  4. There is a major issue right now with supplement counterfeiting, especially on Amazon. This can mean the supplement label can look just like you expect. Except the contents of the capsules aren’t the supplement you are buying. Or worse, the contents are something toxic.

This is all why I’m very careful about getting supplements from reputable suppliers like the ones listed below.

Information on using Perilla Extract if you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

First, always work with your healthcare provider on whether to take a supplement. Everyone is different. And if you take medications, you need to check with your prescriber or pharmacist before adding new things.

I always recommend my clients start new supplements with a very small amount and increase slowly.

Many people work up to 1 tablet or capsule 30 minutes before each meal. This can support the mast cells in the gut.

A very small number of people can’t take supplements on an empty stomach. In this case, 1 tablet with each meal is an option.

Who Should NOT take Perilla Seed Extract?

People with these problems may not do well with Perilla Extract:

  • Salicylate Intolerance
  • Inability to tolerate any supplements
  • Allergies to Mint Family plants

What are good, reputable brands of Perilla Seed Extract?

These are the 2 that I’m using:

 

 

Where to Get More Information about Supplements if you have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

I put together a class I call the Top 8 Mast Cell Supporting Supplements Master Class.

This class is for people who aren’t sure where to start with supplements. Or who have been trying supplements but they are having trouble with them.

I packed a ton of information for you into this class. Here are the highlights:

  • The Top 8 Mast Cell Supporting Supplements that your Doctor doesn’t even know about
  • In-depth on the Actions and Benefits of these 8 Mast Cell Supporting Supplements
  • What order to introduce these supplements in
  • What supplements to NOT take if you have Mast Cell Activation
  • How to know whether these supplements can work for you
  • The first things you need to know about Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
  • Troubleshooting Supplement Sensitivities
  • How to Introduce supplements the RIGHT way for Mast Cell Activation
  • The top 7 things to do right away (including supplements and more) during a reaction or flare
  • What to do if you are still having symptoms

If you are interested, you can learn more about it here:

Click Here to Register for the Supplement Master Class

*Some links in this website are affiliate links, which means I may make a very small commission if you purchase through the link. It never costs you any more to purchase through the links, and I try to find the best deals I can. I only recommend products that I love and use personally or use in my practice. Any commissions help support the newsletter, website, and ongoing research so I can continue to offer you free tips, recipes, and info. Thank you for your support!

References about Perilla Seed Extract relevant to those with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or Histamine Intolerance

Perilla Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perilla#/media/File:Perilla.jpg

da Silva EZM, Jamur MC, Oliver C. Mast cell function: a new vision of an old cell. Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry. 2014;62(10):698-738. doi:10.1369/0022155414545334.

Das M, Ram A and Ghosh B. Luteolin alleviates bronchoconstriction and airway hyperreactivity in ovalbumin sensitized mice. Inflammation Research. 2003;52:101-106.

David Spoerl, Haig Nigolian, Christoph Czarnetzki, Thomas Harr. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1223; doi:10.3390/ijms18061223

Hirano T, Higa S, Arimitsu J, Naka T, Ogata A, Shima Y, Fujimoto M, Yamadori T, Ohkawara T, Kuwabara Y, Kawai M, Matsuda H, Yoshikawa M, Maezaki N, Tanaka T, Kawase I, Tanaka T. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2006;340:1-7.

Imaoka K, Inoue S, Takahashi T, Ojima Y. 1993. Effect of Perilla frutescens extract on anti-DNP IgE antibody production in mice. Jpn J Allergol 42: 74–80.

Kimata M, Shichijo M, Miura T, Serizawa I, Inagaki N and Nagai H. Effects of luteolin, quercetin and baicalein on immunoglobulin E-mediated mediator release from human cultured mast cells. Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 2000;30:501-508.

Makino T, Furuta Y, Wakushima H, Fujii H, Saito K and Kano Y. Antiallergic effect of Perilla frutescens and its active constituents. Phytotherapy Research. 2004;17:240-243.

Makino T, Furuta Y, Wakushima H, Fujii H, Saito K and Kano Y. Effect of oral treatment of Perilla frutescens and its constituents on type-I allergy in mice. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 2001;24(10):1206-1209.

Moon, T. C., Befus, A. D., & Kulka, M. (2014). Mast cell mediators: their differential release and the secretory pathways involved. Frontiers in immunology, 5, 569. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2014.00569

Sanbongi C, Takano H, Osakabe N, Sasa N, Natsume M, Yanagisawa R, Inoue K-I, Sadakane K, Icinose T and Yoshikawa T. Rosmarinic acid in perilla extract inhibits allergic inflammation induced by mite allergen, in a mouse model. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34:971-977.

Shimoi K. Okada H, Kaneko J, Michiyo F, Goda T, Takase S, Suzuki M, Hara Y and Kinae N. Bioavailability and antioxidant properties of luteolin.

Shin TY, Kim SH, Kim SH, Kim YK, Park HJ, Chae BS, Jung HJ, Kim HM. Inhibitory effect of mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions in rats by Perilla frutescens. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol 2000;22(3);489-500.

Shin TY, Kim SH, Kim SH, Kim YK, Park HJ, Chae BS, Jung HJ, Kim HM. Inhibitory effect of mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions in rats by Perilla frutescens. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol 2000;22(3);489-500.

Takano H, Osakabe N, Sanbongi C, Yanagisawa R, Inoue K-I, Yasuda A, Natsume M, Baba S, Ichiishi E-I and Yoshikawa T. Extract of Perilla frutescens enriched for rosmarinic acid, a polyphenolic phytochemical, inhibits seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in humans. Exp Biol Med. 2004;229:247-254.

Theoharides TC, Kempuraj D and Iliopoulou BP. Mast cells, T cells, and inhibition by luteolin: implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of multiple sclerosis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2007;601:423-30.

Ueda H, Yamazaki C and Yamazaki M. Luteolin as an anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic constituent of Perilla frutescens. Biol Pharm. Bull.2002;25(9):1197-1202.

Yano S, Tachibana H and Yamada K. Flavones suppress the expression of the high-affinity IgE receptor Fc‐RI in human basophilic KU812 cells. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53:1812-1817.

Yano S, Umeda D, Maeda N, Fujimura Y, Yamada K and Tachibana H. Dietary apigenin suppresses IgE and inflammatory cytokines production in C57BL/6N mice. J Agric Food Chem. 2006;54:5203-5207.

Yano S, Umeda D, Yamashita T, Ninomiya T, Sumida M, Fujimura Y, Yamada K and Tachibana H. Dietary flavones suppresses IgE and Th2 cytokines in OVA-immunized BALB/c mice. European Journal of Nutrition. 2007;46:257-263

Comments

  1. Niki

    Thank you for sharing this Beth! Are there any liquid options? I generally find these more effective than tablets but perhaps that is supplement dependent. Thanks!

Add A Comment